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21 Posts authored by: Guus der Kinderen Champion

For many years now, Google is orchestrating its "Summer of Code" program. GSoC aims to bring student developers into the open source community, during the summer holidays.

 

As it did before, the XMPP Standards Foundation (XSF) will act as an umbrella organisation for this years edition of GSoC. The Ignite Realtime community is open to accept students under this umbrella.

 

If you're a student and interested in working on one of our projects as part of GSoC, you should get in contact! We've prepared a number of teaser tasks as well as project ideas, all of which are available in the XSF wiki.

Most of our projects have a long history. This certainly goes for Spark, which was created over ten years ago. Although many of you are actively using Spark today, it is beginning to show its age. This is something that we have been planning to address for a while now.

 

Spark was created around the same time that the Kyoto protocol went into effect, Pluto got demoted to the status of 'dwarf planet' and Italy won the FIFA world cup in Germany. Thereabouts.

 

Comment.jpgSince then, source code development tooling has improved a lot. Today, the Spark project is struggling to find active contributors. We believe that one of the reasons for this is that it's pretty hard for developers (especially those that are used to work with modern tooling) to get started with our project. We have been working on that. First, we moved all of our projects from our old Subversion repository to Github. We have noticed that this dramatically improved the accessibility of our code. Second, Smack 4 happened, bringing the backbone of Spark back up-to-date.

 

Now, we are addressing the structure of the project itself. We will restructure the project as a Apache Maven project. This will bring a good deal of predictable structure to the project, which has many benefits. One of these is that the project will integrate easily with various development tools.

 

Moving Spark from its existent Ant-based structure to a Maven structure is no small task. There is no one right way of doing this. We have given it a shot and have created a structure that we think is very workable. Before committing to this structure, we would very much invite others to have a look, and comment on what we've done. The reasoning behind this is simple: once we've committed to a particular structure, it will be disruptive to change it. If we want to apply improvements, we should do so now.

 

Please, review our new project structure, and let us know what you think. You can find the new structure in the SPARK-1791_Maven branch on Github.

 

Ask yourselves: does this structure help me? Is it easier to compile the source code? Can I integrate it with my IDE of choice without too much trouble? Can I create new plugins? Does the new structure introduce a problem that needs to be addressed before committing? Can it be improved? We welcome all feedback!

I am happy to announce that we are bringing back one of our older projects from the grave: the Asterisk-IM project! This project was started in 2005 by Jive Software, and can be used to integrate the Asterisk platform in Openfire. Due to a lack of manpower over the last few years, development stalled. No longer!

 

We have found the most excellent Marcelo Terres willing and able to take on the reigns as project lead for the project! Simultaneously a code contribution by Ron Arts brought back compatibility of the Asterisk-IM source code with both recent versions of Openfire, as well as Asterisk 13 - but more on that later, from Marcelo.

 

I am more than confident that the project is in good hands with Marcelo. Not only has Marcelo been a active manager of the primarily Brazilian-based Openfire community, he is heavily involved in the Asterisk project, going as far as to speaking on AstriCon 2016.

 

As of now, we restored references to the project in our Ignite Realtime community. There is some more work to be done: downloads still point to an older release, and we might be lacking a bit of project infrastructure (such as an issue tracker, dedicated community forum, etc), but I'll leave that to Marcelo to put in place as he sees fit.

 

Marcelo, thanks for doing this! I'm excited to have you on board (as far as you weren't already)!

A few months ago, I wrote about the relocation of our community. The bits and bolts that power our community have since been migrated, and all is running wel. During that progress, we had a couple of awkward moments along the lines of: "to whom will Jive transfer ownership of the DNS records for Ignite?" We started discussing that topic, and concluded that it would be good to have a legal entity to represent our community.

 

We've been working on a plan ever since, that today, I'd like to share with you. We're planning to start a foundation, the Ignite Realtime Foundation. Its objective: to promote, support and advance development of software in the Ignite Realtime Open Source community.

 

If you're interested in this effort, have questions, or want to contribute in effort or resources, please reach out. We've set up a new chat room at irf@conference.igniterealtime.org that we use for discussions on the subject.

moving-home.jpgPlease be aware that over the next few days, the IgniteRealtime community will be moved to new server environment. As a result, new IP addresses will be used for the XMPP domain, this website and the Atlassian stack (JIRA, Bamboo et al). The community forum (everything under the "community" tab of the website) is not affected by the migration.

 

We plan to move gradually, a few services at a time. The migration will start in the coming few days, and will continue for some days to come. You can expect some downtime, but that should be limited. Watch this space for updates!

 

So, why are we moving in the first place? I've addressed this previously in a thread on the community, from which I'll cross-post the more interesting bits here.

 

Jive Software has expressed their intention to reduce the sponsoring of the hosting of this community. What will be discontinued specifically is all of the Contegix-based hosting, which includes the servers that run the igniterealtime.org website, our Atlassian stack (Bamboo, JIRA), our XMPP domain, and related tooling. The forum functionality that you're using to read this message is based on the Jive cloud, which is different from the Contegix-based hosting. Jive Software has expressed that we're welcome to continue to make use the Jive cloud-based solution for the foreseeable future.

 

After Jive established the community back in 2006, they continued to put in a lot of effort to maintain and support both the people and software. On top of that, they've been incredibly generous in regards to spending money on development and hosting - looking for suitable replacement for the hosting of this community has made us more aware of exactly how generous, too! But we accept that over time, Jive's business has moved away from XMPP and Instant Messaging. Most of our contacts within the company have also moved on by now, which resulted in where we are today - pretty much distinct entities. It's no wonder that Jive re-evaluated their support. We are extremely grateful for all of the time, effort, and money that we received from them in the past. Jive is also actively working to end our cooperation well, offering support and even donation of the existing hardware, as well as plenty of notice. Kudos.

 

After Jive expressed their intentions, we've been actively searching for a new home for our community. We have had some great offers, more than we would have imagined (thank you!). We eventually decided to accept the generous offer from John Atherton, of Surevine Ltd, who have offered to help us by hosting our entire environment in Amazon, as well as support us during and after the migration. I am inviting Surevine to write a posting here to further introduce themselves.

 

As for the migration: over the past few weeks, several of us (both in the community and within Surevine) have been putting in quite some time to prepare for everything. An important part of the move is rebuilding infrastructure that was put in place over a decade ago. This has been an interesting exercise in spelunking...  We've had to make some adjustments left and right, but we feel that we're good to go. Still, we'd like to ask you to be on the lookout for missing functionality. Although we're trying to cover all bases, a lot of nuts and bolts were added over the last few years. We will have missed one or two, or we might have believed some to be non-important while they were not. Feel free to pop into the community chat or leave a message here if you think we missed something!

 

Thanks for your patience while we move IgniteRealtime to its new home.

We've had quite some feedback from our recent 4.0.0 release. As is to be expected in a release that has many changes, some issues sneaked in. To address most of them, we released Openfire 4.0.1 today.

 

This release contains various changes, but most importantly fixes problems introduced in 4.0.0 related to LDAP and certificate store management. The complete changelog is available here: Openfire Changelog

 

You can download the new release from the download section on the IgniteRealtime.org website: Ignite Realtime: Downloads

 

The SHA-1 checksums for the various downloads:

PlatformSHA-1 ChecksumFilename
Mac OS Xe912a219e155945e3d9ab5e3f7181fa025d8242c

openfire_4_0_1.dmg

Windows008942ca0f5df38e3a5e69841e97971d658823a7openfire_4_0_1.exe
Tarball0de4d1e9533564484decb88b5d59238722774ed7openfire_4_0_1.tar.gz
ZIP783155b44e7fc5819b2dddc100acdb925ff5e736openfire_4_0_1.zip
Source (Unix)cfbada1c5a25637f0f8c85fef629ff090767e2abopenfire_src_4_0_1.tar.gz
Source (ZIP)0e21d915876d6e08d649714f66141d4acf54a09dopenfire_src_4_0_1.zip
Redhat / CentOSac7328da9faa7ef2614d51195ad711cc2877e778openfire-4.0.1-1.i386.rpm
Debian / Ubuntu1084d7e67299b3ddc20db4bf2a2a6d6bfde29a93openfire_4.0.1_all.deb
Guus der Kinderen

Whack 2.0.0 released

Posted by Guus der Kinderen Champion Jun 22, 2015

2534 days after its last release, we are happy to announce the 2.0.0 release of the Whack API!

 

Whack is our Open Source XMPP (Jabber) component library for XMPP components. External components are processes that run outside of the Openfire's process but can connect to the server to add new functionality. Whack is an implementation of XEP-0114: Jabber Component Protocol.

 

This release brings a number of small improvements and bugfixes. Notably, Whack 2.0.0 is now based on the Tinder API.

 

Starting with the current release, Whack shall also be available through Apache Maven. The artifact coordinates of the core module are: org.igniterealtime.whack:core:2.0.0. The source code includes a number of small examples on how to use the library, which should have you up and running in no time!

The Ignite Realtime community is happy to announce the release of version 3.8.1 of Openfire! Downloads for various platforms are available here.

 

Openfire is a real time collaboration (RTC) server licensed under the Open Source Apache license. It uses the only widely adopted open protocol for instant messaging, XMPP (also called Jabber). Openfire is incredibly easy to setup and administer, but offers rock-solid security and performance.

 

This release is primarily a bugfix release that addresses issues that were reported after the release of 3.8.0, a few weeks ago. Release 3.8.1 includes fixes for, amongst others, shared groups and pubsub-related issues. The release also improves the robustness of loading the Multi-User Chat service at start-up. The changelog lists these and other changes in more detail.

 

As always, we welcome your feedback, suggestions, tips, hints, questions and other contributions in the Ignite Realtime Community pages.

The Ignite Realtime community is happy to announce the release of version 3.8.0 of Openfire! Downloads for various platforms are available here.

 

Openfire is a real time collaboration (RTC) server licensed under the Open Source Apache license. It uses the only widely adopted open protocol for instant messaging, XMPP (also called Jabber). Openfire is incredibly easy to setup and administer, but offers rock-solid security and performance.

 

This release accumulates development efforts made over the past fifteen months. Some highlights of this release are:

  • the new Hazelcast-based clustering plugin (subject of an earlier blog post)
  • substantial improvements to the functionality, scalability and stability of the PubSub implementation (including fixing the PEP related memory leak)
  • improvements of the server-to-server connectivity routines
  • many performance improvements and general bug fixes

The changelog lists these and other changes in more detail.

 

As always, we welcome your feedback, suggestions, tips, hints, questions and other contributions in the Ignite Realtime Community pages.

The Ignite Realtime community is happy to announce the release of version 3.7.1 of Openfire! Downloads for various platforms are available here.

 

Openfire is a real time collaboration (RTC) server licensed under the Open Source Apache license. It uses the only widely adopted open protocol for instant messaging, XMPP (also called Jabber). Openfire is incredibly easy to setup and administer, but offers rock-solid security and performance.

 

The 3.7.1 release is primarily a bugfix release. Amongst others, these issues have been addressed:

  • A number of enhancements were made to the server-to-server connectivity. Server-to-Server connectivity was enhanced and a bug preventing a successful dialback was fixed.
  • Various improvements have been made to platform specific installers and scripts.
  • The Multi-User Chat implementation has received various tweaks and updates.

The full changelog is available on the Openfire project page.

 

We welcome your feedback, suggestions, tips, hints, questions and other contributions in the Ignite Realtime Community pages.

The Ignite Realtime Community is very happy to announce the release of Openfire 3.7.0!

 

You can get your copy of the new release from the Openfire project page on the Ignite Realtime Community website. A fresh batch of plugins, compiled against the latest code is available there too.

 

As it is the accumulation of nearly two years of work, this new release bring a lot of new features, bugfixes and improvements. Amongst the more notable changes:

  • Openfire is now released under the Apache v2.0 licence.
  • Improves how Openfire handles "idle" connections. Some of you may have  the system property xmpp.client.idle set to -1 to work around  previously broken behaviour. You may now let it default to 6 minutes or  set it to your preference.
  • Improved Openfire's caching to be less prone to memory exhaustion by correctly calculating cache size usage.
  • Fixed a bug where admin console login into a newly installed Openfire server would fail until restarted.
  • Fixed a bug with shared rosters within a LDAP environment.
  • A memory leak with the Personal Eventing Protocol (PEP) was fixed.
  • Openfire's custom log interface has been replaced with SLF4J and a Log4J backend.
  • Fix issues with self signed SSL certificates.
  • A number of improvements and fixes were made to the Multi-User Chat (MUC) configuration pages on the admin console
  • There were also some improvements made to the plugins, including the addition of brand new Jingle Nodes plugin.
  • There are also French, Russian, and Lithuanian langauge translation fixes for Openfire and some of the plugins.

 

A complete set of changes since the 3.6.4 release can be found in the release notes. The changes there include the changes that were part of the beta release. Since the beta, 11 issues were fixed.

Good things come to those who wait!

 

The Ignite Realtime Community is pleased to announce the beta for the next release of Openfire. This release contains a number of important  fixes and improvements to stability and XMPP protocol compliance. You can find a full list of fixed issues here. This beta is also the first version of Openfire to be released by the Ignite Realtime community under the Apache License v2.0.

 

You can download the 3.7.0 beta release here. Please provide us your feedback on the Ignite Realtime support forums. It would be helpful if you would tag your comments, discussions and questions with a tag that reads "openfire370beta"

 

As always, but particularly since this is a beta release, make sure to backup any existing version of Openfire and the persistent storage that it uses, before upgrading!

 

Some important security related notes to this release:

  • Openfire no longer ignores the system property to disallow password changes via XMPP. With previous releases, it was not possible to prevent users from changing their password via their XMPP connection. (CVE-2009-1596)
  • Fixed a XSS attack on the admin console login form.

 

Protocol compliance improvements:

  • Publish Subscribe (PubSub)
  • BOSH (http-bind) xml namespace compliance fix.

 

Some highlights of this beta release:

  • Improves how Openfire handles "idle" connections. Some of you may have  the system property xmpp.client.idle set to -1 to work around  previously broken behaviour. You may now let it default to 6 minutes or  set it to your preference.
  • Improved Openfire's caching to be less prone to memory exhaustion by correctly calculating cache size usage.
  • Fixed a bug where admin console login into a newly installed Openfire server would fail until restarted.
  • Fixed a bug with shared rosters within a LDAP environment.
  • Openfire now ships with the latest JRE (1.6.0u21).
  • A memory leak with the Personal Eventing Protocol (PEP) was fixed.
  • Openfire's custom log interface has been replaced with SLF4J and a Log4J backend.
  • Fix issues with self signed SSL certificates.
  • A number of improvements and fixes were made to the Multi-User Chat (MUC) configuration pages on the admin console
  • There were also some improvements made to the plugins.
  • There are also French, Russian, and Lithuanian langauge translation fixes for Openfire and some of the plugins.

We  have just released Tinder  1.2.2, which is a maintenance release. It  fixes a number of bugs, features improved performance and has a number  of new features.

 

Download Tinder from: http://www.igniterealtime.org/downloads/index.jsp

Guus der Kinderen

Openfire at FISL11!

Posted by Guus der Kinderen Champion Jul 21, 2010

http://softwarelivre.org/articles/0019/8129/retangle_180x150.jpg?1272057062This year, Openfire will be the subject of two lectures given at the eleventh edition of the annual FISL conference in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Both presentations are scheduled for the last day of the event, Saturday. The lectures will provide a basic introduction to Openfire and Openfire development. They will be presented by yours truly.

 

If you're interested, I invite you to drop by! I'm pretty sure that Openfire (or even more generic XMPP related) discussions won't stop when the lectures are over. For one, Thiago Camargo, former Openfire developer and author of the new Jingle Relay Nodes enhancement proposal, will be attending as well. I've heard rumors of Openfire-ready implementations, which should be very, very interesting!

 

I'd love to see you there!

As you might or might not know, the XMPP Standards Foundation has been accepted as a mentoring organization for the 2010 edition of the Google Summer of Code. Amongst others, specific project proposals for the IgniteRealtime community are available. They are being discussed in GSoC 2010 Projects. The deadline for student applications is next Friday (April 9th, 19:00  UTC). If you are interested, head over to the XSF wiki for  more information!

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